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Posts Tagged ‘caregiving’

A Virginia Assisted Living Facility Offers Innovative Alzheimer’s Care

Sunday, November 28th, 2010

Quite often, individuals suffering from Alzheimer’s Disease require skilled nursing and memory care that is outside the capacity of well-meaning family members and friends. The caregivers of Alzheimer’s patients, who are usually their adult children, are also often taking care of their own children. Such caregivers are part of the “sandwich generation,” a segment of the population that is trying to balance the demands of a full-time job with those of a nuclear family, and then trying to balance these demands with those of an aging parent. (more…)

Aging in the Golden State and California’s Home Care Providers

Saturday, October 30th, 2010

A recent article in the University of California’s California Agriculture journal, entitled “The Golden State goes gray: What aging will mean for California,” explores the looming issue of undertrained and overburdened in-home caregivers and the growing elderly population. (more…)

Who are the Typical Informal Caregivers in the State of New York?

Thursday, October 14th, 2010

Informal caregivers can be friends, neighbors, or relatives who provide assistance and, quite often, long term care to an individual who is either physically and/or mentally incapacitated and needs help with the tasks of daily living. Such caregivers are termed informal because they are not paid for their services. Yet, who are the typical informal caregivers in the state of New York, and what are their concerns? (more…)

Staying Healthy During Ontario’s Winter Months

Wednesday, January 13th, 2010

Staying Healthy During Ontario’s Winter Months

The number of seniors in Ontario is growing at a rapid rate as baby boomers reach their golden years. All the extra seniors couldn’t come at a worse time for Ontario’s public health system, which is faced with a record deficit in 2010. The government has already warned hospitals to expect no increase in funding, a 1% increase in funding, or a 2% increase in funding. This is bad news for hospitals, who expect to see their expenses go up by at least 3 – 3.5%, leaving a significant funding gap that would affect the services that they can provide. Where might a reduction in hospital services leave Ontario’s seniors, who in general require more health care than the average younger Canadian? (more…)

Signs of Stroke

Monday, January 11th, 2010

Signs of Stroke


Not all strokes are catastrophic and immediately obvious. Many minor strokes hit without seniors or their caretakers immediately noticing. The longer it takes to recognize that a stroke has occurred, the more damage will be done to the brain, making recovery time longer and certain stroke side-effects potentially permanent.

Here are six signs to look for that indicate a stroke has occurred: (more…)

Tips for Caregivers

Monday, January 11th, 2010

Tips for Caregivers


Emotionally, caring for an elderly parent who always cared for you can be a disconcerting role reversal, and without addressing these new emotions, caregivers eventually feel frazzled, overwhelmed, and unable to deal with all the new changes. But with proper preparation, a lot of the stress that comes from taking on the role of primary caregiver for an elderly relative can be avoided.

One of the hardest things for caregivers is (more…)

Eldercare and the Workplace: How to Strike a Balance

Monday, January 11th, 2010

Eldercare and the Workplace: How to Strike a Balance


Canadian employers are understandably concerned about the effects that elder care has on the workforce. In Canada, over 70% of caregivers to the elderly also hold down a job. Many of these caregivers also have a family of their own, with children still living at home.

The stress is too much for some to handle; more than a fifth of Canadians caring for an elderly relative have reported (more…)

Private Health Care in Ontario; H1N1

Tuesday, November 3rd, 2009

Private Health Care in Ontario

The privatization of health care in Ontario is here, whether we like it or not. As Dr. Albert Schumacher, the former president of the Canadian Medical Association put it, “The situation we are seeing now are more services around not being funded publicly but people having to pay for them, or their insurance companies. We have a sort of passive privatization” (Source: CBC.ca). In Ontario, when Liberals won in 2003, they promised to shut down the provinces growing number of private clinics, but in 2006 when Conservatives won federally, that promise stalled. It seems that in Ontario, as in other provinces throughout Canada, the growth of private health care is inevitable.

(more…)

Being Prepared for Long Term Care in Toronto, Ontario and Surrounding Areas

Tuesday, October 20th, 2009

Being Prepared for Long Term Care in Toronto, Ontario and Surrounding Areas

One of the best things that baby boomers in their late fifties and early sixties can do is plan for their own long term care while they still can. Anyone who has cared for their own seventy-something, eight-something, or ninety-something parents can testify to the fact that as Canadians live longer, their long term care needs also increase.

Some of the questions baby boomers planning for their twilight years should ask themselves include: (more…)

I Live in the Sandwich Generation; HELP!

Tuesday, October 20th, 2009

Caregiver Support   Toronto, Ontario

Ontario’s life expectancy at the moment is 75 – but it’s on the rise. According to most estimates, the number of Ontario citizens who will be 85 or older will more than double by 2020. While on the one hand it is wonderful that so many Ontario residents are living longer, the rising number of older Canadians also represents a toll on families and health care systems. After all, who is it who will be caring for all these elderly Ontario residents? In many cases, it’s the Sandwich Generation.

(more…)

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